HB 1570: Passed into law – effective June 7, 2018

Concerning access to homeless housing and assistance.

Governor signed HB 1570 on March  15, 2018 to be effective on June 7, 2018.

An additional surcharge of $62.00 shall be charged by the county auditor for each document recorded, which will be in addition to any other charge allowed by law.

The legislature recognizes that all of the  people of the state should have the opportunity to live in a safe, healthy, and affordable home. The legislature further recognizes that homelessness in Washington is unacceptable and that action needs to be taken to protect vulnerable households including families with children, youth and young adults, veterans, seniors, and people at high risk of homelessness, including survivors of domestic violence and people living with mental illness and other disabilities. The legislature recognizes that homelessness has immediate and often times long-term consequences on the educational achievement of public school children and disproportionately impacts students of color. Additionally, the legislature recognizes that the health and safety of people experiencing homelessness is immediately and oftentimes significantly compromised, and that homelessness exacerbates physical and behavioral health disabilities.

The legislature further recognizes that homelessness is disproportionately experienced by people of color and LGBTQ youth and young adults. The legislature recognizes that homelessness is also disproportionately experienced by people living with mental illness and that homelessness is an impediment to treatment. The legislature further recognizes that homelessness is disproportionately experienced by Native Americans. In 2005, the Washington state legislature passed the homeless housing and assistance act that outlined several bold policies to address homelessness. That act also required a strategic plan by the department of commerce, which was first submitted in 2006 and subsequently updated. Since the first statewide plan, the state has succeeded in housing over five hundred fifty-six thousand people experiencing homelessness. These people were previously living in places not meant for human habitation, living in emergency shelters, or at imminent risk of becoming homeless. Although the overall prevalence of homelessness is down more than seventeen percent, the recent increase in homelessness, due in large part to surging housing costs, remains a crisis and more must be done. Therefore, the legislature intends to improve resources available to aid with increasing access and removing barriers to housing for individuals and families in Washington.

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